Choosing when to market to your customers is half the battle - and often much easier said than done.

We explore some of the options to help you decide when’s best for your business!

A study conducted by GetResponse has also shown that emails have the best chance of being opened within an hour after they arrive in your customer’s inbox – but after just 4 hours, the chances drop to less than 5%! Therefore, when you want to stand out in a jam-packed inbox, it’s critical that your email arrives as close as possible to the time your subscribers are able to read it.

Depending on your industry, you’ll probably have a good idea of when your customers are most likely to be looking for your product or service, but as a general rule of thumb, to find out what time is best for the majority of your customer base, you will need to do your research, which means testing out different times for yourself. Here are some suggestions we hope will help you out when it comes to your send times.

 

Weekends

Interestingly, many companies choose not to send on a weekend - feeling that Saturday and Sunday are ‘bad’ days, because their customers and prospects are likely to be out and about or spending time with the family.

However, this common assumption actually means less clutter from competitors in the inbox and a good chance of your message being opened and looked at in detail. A study by Experian has confirmed that recipients are generally more responsive to emails they receive during the weekend. After all, the majority of your customers’ needs don’t suddenly take a break at 5.30pm on Fridays.

Conversely, it’s likely that they will devote more time to actively following up on offers and emails that interest them on these typically more ‘relaxed’ days.

Weekdays

There are lots of different opinions about weekends. So, let's start with the beginning and end days.

There’s always the logic that Friday isn’t a good day, because it’s 'too near to the weekend', whereas Monday is 'too busy', but that doesn’t mean you should automatically discount either of these day. For example, a text that arrives on a Friday morning could appeal to those interested in taking up last minute deals.

Try to put yourself in your customer's shoes - when are they likely to be looking for what you are offering? Do they work 9 - 5? Are you telling or selling? If it's a deal, a send between 9am and 12 might catch their eye. Unfortunately, you’ll never please everyone, but finding that optimum hour might just delight the majority.

The below infographic, based on a study carried out by Experian, showed that recipients across all industries are surprisingly active late at night.

But is this so astonishing? According to Litmus, 48% of emails are now opened on mobile devices. Thanks to their constantly developing capabilities, smartphones are becoming ever more prevalent in the world of marketing, as well as the lives of consumers. They’re so much more convenient than a desktop when we’re on the go, giving us the freedom to check our emails and reply to them whenever we want, whether we’re eating, shopping or commuting.

This is great news for marketers, meaning that a send outside normal working hours can actually be quite lucrative.

The Tuesday Theory

Tuesday – it’s the day that email studies seldom mention. It’s the second day of the working week, and can be just as disheartening as Monday because the weekend is barely in sight, so it’s no surprise that multiple studies have found that we experience the most professional and emotional stress on this seemingly innocuous day.

A 2013 study found that Tuesday is the most popular day of the week to send emails, giving it the highest open rate compared to the other 4 weekdays. Something you might want to consider if you have a particularly good offer to share with those subscribers who might just be feeling a bit dispirited!

So, how can you find out what works for your company?

We've explored the Tuesday theory, weekend sends and why Monday might not be so bad, and your head is probably spinning from all of the possibilities. So, here's what you need to do in a nutshell: test, test and test again. Try different times and different days to get an idea of what works best for your brand.

Of course, you can try to hazard a guess on the best time to send based on the enquiries you receive after your email has gone out, but this really isn’t the most reliable way of measuring your results. With the BriefYourMarket.com reporting tool, you can follow the progress of your newsletter and track its success from the minute you’ve hit ‘send’.

See a holistic view of your open, click-through rates and unsubscribe rates, as well as which articles are the most popular and how many time your newsletter has been forwarded or printed.

Once you’ve decided when to send your newsletter, you don’t have to wait at your computer until the time comes. With BriefYourMarket.com, you can schedule your newsletter to arrive whenever you want, so you can be on the road, on holiday or even in bed when it goes out! So, who says you can’t make money in your sleep?

Choosing when to market to your customers is half the battle - and often much easier said than done.

We explore some of the options to help you decide when’s best for your business!

A study conducted by GetResponse has also shown that emails have the best chance of being opened within an hour after they arrive in your customer’s inbox – but after just 4 hours, the chances drop to less than 5%! Therefore, when you want to stand out in a jam-packed inbox, it’s critical that your email arrives as close as possible to the time your subscribers are able to read it.

Depending on your industry, you’ll probably have a good idea of when your customers are most likely to be looking for your product or service, but as a general rule of thumb, to find out what time is best for the majority of your customer base, you will need to do your research, which means testing out different times for yourself. Here are some suggestions we hope will help you out when it comes to your send times.

 

Weekends

Interestingly, many companies choose not to send on a weekend - feeling that Saturday and Sunday are ‘bad’ days, because their customers and prospects are likely to be out and about or spending time with the family.

However, this common assumption actually means less clutter from competitors in the inbox and a good chance of your message being opened and looked at in detail. A study by Experian has confirmed that recipients are generally more responsive to emails they receive during the weekend. After all, the majority of your customers’ needs don’t suddenly take a break at 5.30pm on Fridays.

Conversely, it’s likely that they will devote more time to actively following up on offers and emails that interest them on these typically more ‘relaxed’ days.

Weekdays

There are lots of different opinions about weekends. So, let's start with the beginning and end days.

There’s always the logic that Friday isn’t a good day, because it’s 'too near to the weekend', whereas Monday is 'too busy', but that doesn’t mean you should automatically discount either of these day. For example, a text that arrives on a Friday morning could appeal to those interested in taking up last minute deals.

Try to put yourself in your customer's shoes - when are they likely to be looking for what you are offering? Do they work 9 - 5? Are you telling or selling? If it's a deal, a send between 9am and 12 might catch their eye. Unfortunately, you’ll never please everyone, but finding that optimum hour might just delight the majority.

The below infographic, based on a study carried out by Experian, showed that recipients across all industries are surprisingly active late at night.

But is this so astonishing? According to Litmus, 48% of emails are now opened on mobile devices. Thanks to their constantly developing capabilities, smartphones are becoming ever more prevalent in the world of marketing, as well as the lives of consumers. They’re so much more convenient than a desktop when we’re on the go, giving us the freedom to check our emails and reply to them whenever we want, whether we’re eating, shopping or commuting.

This is great news for marketers, meaning that a send outside normal working hours can actually be quite lucrative.

The Tuesday Theory

Tuesday – it’s the day that email studies seldom mention. It’s the second day of the working week, and can be just as disheartening as Monday because the weekend is barely in sight, so it’s no surprise that multiple studies have found that we experience the most professional and emotional stress on this seemingly innocuous day.

A 2013 study found that Tuesday is the most popular day of the week to send emails, giving it the highest open rate compared to the other 4 weekdays. Something you might want to consider if you have a particularly good offer to share with those subscribers who might just be feeling a bit dispirited!

So, how can you find out what works for your company?

We've explored the Tuesday theory, weekend sends and why Monday might not be so bad, and your head is probably spinning from all of the possibilities. So, here's what you need to do in a nutshell: test, test and test again. Try different times and different days to get an idea of what works best for your brand.

Of course, you can try to hazard a guess on the best time to send based on the enquiries you receive after your email has gone out, but this really isn’t the most reliable way of measuring your results. With the BriefYourMarket.com reporting tool, you can follow the progress of your newsletter and track its success from the minute you’ve hit ‘send’.

See a holistic view of your open, click-through rates and unsubscribe rates, as well as which articles are the most popular and how many time your newsletter has been forwarded or printed.

Once you’ve decided when to send your newsletter, you don’t have to wait at your computer until the time comes. With BriefYourMarket.com, you can schedule your newsletter to arrive whenever you want, so you can be on the road, on holiday or even in bed when it goes out! So, who says you can’t make money in your sleep?